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Far and away the best thing you can do for your garden is to use organic compost, and it's even better if you make it yourself. Though composting seems pretty straightforward, there are a few things to know as you add your waste to the pile and plan for garden application later in the year.  First, Why Compost? Composting is a great way to  create a nutrient rich, humus component to add to your garden. Once broken down, the compost serves as a great way to improve the soil structure and increase water retention. Compost also adds a beneficial bacterial community...

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Life is so much better when you get along with your neighbors. Plants agree! That’s why companion planting can help your garden thrive and flourish. Companion planting is simple: arrange plants in your garden so that they are near the ones they “get along with.” There are a few different ways plants can form symbiotic relationships with each other: Repel pests. Certain plants repel pests that might otherwise overtake their neighbors. Provide shade. Planting taller plants that need full sun next to those that like more shade is a space-saving strategy. Attract pollinators. Certain flowers attract butterflies and bees -...

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Spinach is a cold-hardy vegetable that can be planted in very early spring as well as fall and winter. It is easy to grow and does well in cool spring and fall weather. Though it has a good yield and is slow to bolt, it is best to plant spinach in successive plantings to keep growing garden fresh spinach all season long. With similar growing requirements to lettuce, it is higher in iron, calcium, and vitamins than most cultivated greens, and one of the best sources of vitamins A, B, and C. How to Grow Spinach: Although seedlings can be propagated...

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Tomatoes comes in a variety of shapes and sizes from large plump slicing tomatoes to bell shaped romas perfect for sauce making. You can even find a wide variety of small cherry tomatoes perfect for salad.  How to Grow Tomatoes: Indoors Tomatoes are best started indoors 7 weeks before your last spring frost. Plant the tomato seed about 1/4″ below the surface of the soil. Outdoors Space 24-30″ apart in a warm, sunny area of your garden. Transplanting Till soil 1 foot deep 2 weeks before transplanting seedlings outdoors. Harden off for one week before transplanting in the garden. Space transplants 2 feet apart....

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Traditionally grown in the Southern US, okra is a warmer weather plant. It’s easy to grow and is rich in Vitamin A without many calories. The beautiful white and yellow flowers add a touch of beauty to your garden. How to Grow Okra: Indoors Seeds should be started indoors in peat pots 3-4 weeks before your last spring frost. Plant the okra seed about a half inch below the surface of the soil. It’s recommended to start your okra directly in your garden soil as they don’t always transplant well. Outdoors Plant directly into the garden 3-4 weeks before your last...

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